Chris Long Is Donating His Entire Salary to Charity This Year

Pro football player Chris Long is donating his entire salary for this season to various educational causes. This entire piece by Charlotte Wilder at SB Nation is enlightening, but one quote of Long’s while speaking to a group of high school students stuck out to me:

Life is short. Live it with joy. I really think that the biggest thing I could leave you with today is to take pleasure in the work that you do, whether in classroom or community, and enjoy it. Be that contagious light that spreads energy to other people. Great people make other people feel they can be great, too. We talk about this in the locker room as football players and leaders, how you want everyone around you to feel like they can be great for having played with you, sat in a classroom with you, been a friend of yours. Through your loyalty, your excitement, and for who you are. Be contagious in your energy.

DePaul Campus Planner Quotes, Part 6

The last installment!

“Success is walking from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.” — Winston Churchill

“When you stop chasing the wrong things you give the right things a chance to catch you.” — Lolly Daskal

“I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have.” — Thomas Jefferson

“People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.” — Zig Ziglar

 

Past posts: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5

Quotes From Jobs, Hemingway, Chopin, and Tony Bennett

Here are some quotes I came across in recent weeks that I liked:

“Life teaches you how to live it, if you live long enough.” — Tony Bennett, speaking in the 2015 documentary Amy, about singer Amy Winehouse.

Steve Jobs: “…one of the ways that I believe people express their appreciation to the rest of humanity is to make something wonderful and put it out thereBut somehow, in the act of making something with a great deal of care and love, something is transmitted there. And it’s a way of expressing to the rest of our species our deep appreciation.”

“There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.” — Ernest Hemingway

“Reality is a cloud of possibilities, not a point.” — Amos Tversky

Simplicity is the final achievement. After one has played a vast quantity of notes and more notes, it is simplicity that emerges as the crowning reward of art.” — Frederic Chopin

DePaul Campus Planner Quotes, Part 2

Here are five more quotes that stuck with me from the DePaul Campus Planner I picked up at the university rec center. Part 1 is here.

“I have learned over the years that when one’s mind is made up, this diminishes fear.” — Rosa Parks

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” — Martin Luther King Jr.

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” — Thomas Edison

Luck is where preparation meets opportunity.” — Eric Knotts

Create your own destiny. If you don’t, someone else will.” — Chris Leber

DePaul Campus Planner Quotes, Part 1

I live about ten paces from the eastern edge of DePaul University’s campus in Chicago. The university’s rec center, The Ray, is a terrific workout facility for students and locals. This month, with the return of students to campus, The Ray was giving away free campus planners for the new school year.

Ever the planner, I grabbed one for myself. What surprised me is how many awesome “quote of the week” entries there were throughout the planner. This will be part 1 of me posting five quotes from the DePaul campus planner.

“Seek the lofty by reading, hearing and seeing great work at some moment every day.” — Thornton Wilder

The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity.” — Amelia Earhart

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” — Maya Angelou

“Few things can help an individual more than to place responsibility on him, and to let him know that you trust him.” — Booker T. Washington

“If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, don’t ask what seat! Just get on.” — Sheryl Sandberg

Pioneering Journalist Lillian Ross Passes Away at 99

Lillian Ross joined The New Yorker as a literary journalist in 1945 and then proceeded to work for the magazine for over seventy years. She did a profile of Ernest Hemingway in 1950. She sent photographs of her adopted baby in 1965 to Catcher in the Rye author J.D. Salinger. (Salinger’s awesome response: “He’s roaring with laughter. Oh, if he can only hold on to it.”)

She jotted down conversations and quotes in a notebook instead of using a recorder, which she did not believe in. She even did a story on Lin-Manuel Miranda ten years ago, well before his Hamilton fame.

Last, you can sense the appreciation of the younger writing staff regarding the attentiveness Ross showed them.

She took young people seriously, an art not always cultivated among grownups…In so doing, she provided an example of how to be taken seriously by younger people—an objective that, for women especially, becomes more challenging as the years mount. Lillian was a generous champion of younger writers at the magazine

Source: Rebecca Mead at The New Yorker

What Separates Professionals From Amateurs?

From Shane Parrish at Farnam Street:

The focus of Parrish’s post is why some individuals go on to great success while others are just staying afloat. There are numerous factors but here he focuses on the difference in mindset.

Amateurs stop when they achieve something. Professionals understand that the initial achievement is just the beginning.

Amateurs have a goal. Professionals have a process.

Amateurs see feedback and coaching as someone criticizing them as a person. Professionals know they have weak spots and seek out thoughtful criticism.

Amateurs value an isolated great performance while professionals value consistency every day.

Instead of quitting at the first setback, professionals understand a short-term failure is part of learning and mastering a skill.

Amateurs focus on being right. Professionals focus on getting the best outcome.

Amateurs make decisions in committees so there is no one person responsible if things go wrong. Professionals make decisions as individuals and accept responsibility.

Amateurs blame others. Professionals accept responsibility.

Amateurs go faster. Professionals go further.

Amateurs think disagreements are threats. Professionals see them as an opportunity to learn.